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Dr Mann - Moving? Here's a Quick Guide for Switching to a New Dentist

Moving is a stressful process. There are a million different things for you to think about, from getting boxes to setting up cable and internet. One thing you might not consider in the moving process is establishing yourself with a new dentist. Eventually though, this is something you will have to do. Here is a guide for switching to a new dentist to make your transition easy.

Schedule an Appointment in Advance

Depending on where you move, it may take you a while to find a new dentist that will work with you. Each dentist can only take on a certain number of patients without being overwhelmed. Thus if you want to register as a new patient, you will have to find a dentist with an opening for you. You will also need to keep your dental insurance in mind because you will need to find someone in your network. The sooner you schedule an appointment, the better off you will be.

Check Reviews from Local Clients

If you have several dentists to choose from in your insurance network, do some research online to see what other people are saying about the practice. While you’re at it, you might want to check the dentist’s website to find out what kinds of services he or she specializes in. This is not something you can over-research. You might just have to spend a little extra time finding the perfect dentist for you.

Request a Copy of Your Dental Records

Your new dentist will most likely take new X-rays to get up to date images of your mouth, but it would be nice for them to have old ones to look at as well. If your current dentist keeps electronic dental records, those can easily be sent to the new dentist. If not, you will need to get a copy of your records to give to your new dentist.

Note What Medications You Are Taking

Your dentist needs to know what medications you are taking in case they impact the state of your teeth. He or she will also need to know this in case you need to go on any special medications for your oral health. This is usually not the case, but it is always nice to have a list of your current medications on hand if they are needed.

Don’t forget about your dentist when you change locations, and your teeth will always be in good hands.

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Keep Your Smile Clean with a Clean Toothbrush

Your toothbrush is supposed to be a tool for keeping your mouth clean, but it can also be a breeding ground for harmful bacteria. This may cause more problems in your mouth than it gets rid of. In order to ensure your teeth are as clean as they can possibly be, you need to work on cleaning your toothbrush. The guide below explains how to clean a toothbrush effectively so your smile can shine bright.

Rinse It Off

Every time you brush your teeth, you need to rinse out your toothbrush. You probably do this already to get rid of the toothpaste that gets stuck on the bottom of the bristles. Try to use high pressure water to basically powerwash the debris out of the bristles. This will give you a clean start the next time you go to brush your teeth.

Use Toothbrush Sanitizer

You can buy special sanitizer that is designed to thoroughly clean your toothbrush. You don’t have to use this every single time you brush your teeth, but it would be worth using once a week or even once a month just to get your toothbrush looking its best. Think of this like spring cleaning for your toothbrush, only more frequent and less time consuming.

If you don’t want to use toothbrush sanitizer, you can also throw your toothbrush in the dishwasher. It may seem unnatural at first, but it will make your toothbrush look like new again.

Store It Properly

Don’t store your toothbrush face down in a cup or in a bathroom drawer. The goal is to expose the head of the toothbrush to as much air as possible because that will help kill the bacteria on it. You can buy toothbrush covers that have ventilation holes in them, if you want to keep it covered without suffocating your toothbrush. Otherwise, just keep it head up in a toothbrush holder or something along those lines to make your toothbrush as clean as possible.

Buy a New Toothbrush

After about six months of regular use, your toothbrush is no longer going to be good to use. The bristles will be worn, and you simply won’t get the same fresh-from-the-dentist feeling that you get from a new toothbrush. If you are sick, you might want to replace your toothbrush after healing to avoid infecting yourself once again. Know when it’s time to get rid of your old toothbrush, and you will always have a new one to use.

DISCLAIMER: THIS CONTENT IS NOT MEDICAL ADVICE

The information, including but not limited to, text, graphics, images and other material contained on this website are for informational purposes only. The purpose of this website is to promote broad understanding and knowledge of various dental and health topics. It is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Always seek the advice from a qualified medical professional.

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7 Creative Ways to Use Dental Floss

Want to get more out of a roll of dental floss than just clean teeth? This simple nylon string has a number of potential uses that reach far beyond the corners of your smile. Listed below are seven creative ways to use dental floss.

Sew with It

Have a button that keeps coming off your shirt? Sew it on with dental floss instead next time. You can also try using dental floss to fix tears in thick material because it can stand up better than most thread.

Bake with It

If you keep breaking your freshly baked cookies with your spatula, try sliding some floss underneath them to pry them off the baking sheet. Once they have released themselves completely, you can use a spatula for the actual lifting process.

De-Badge with It

If you want to take badges or stickers off your car, you can use dental floss to help you do this. Lowly work the floss behind the adhesive backing on the badge until it come loose. You may need to wear gloves for this in case the floss cuts into your hands.

Cut with It

You can use dental floss to cut soft foods, like cake, bananas, hard boiled eggs, and some cheeses. Wrap each end of the floss around one of your fingers and then pull it tight. You can move down on the food after that to create perfect slices even better than a knife would make.

Decorate with It

You can use dental floss to hang pictures, sun catchers, Christmas ornaments, and much more. As long as the item is small or somewhat light, the floss should be strong enough to hold it up.

Repair with It

If you have a leaky faucet that you can’t fix just yet, you could use dental floss for a quick solution to your problems. Tie the floss around the head of the faucet and then set the other end of it inside of the drain. When the leaks come, the water will follow the path of the floss and not make any noise.

Garden with It

Have some unruly vines that need directing? You could use dental floss to tie the vines to a trellis. You could also use floss to hold together groups of bamboo or other plants like that when you want them to grow close with one another. Play around with some different ideas, and you will soon see boring old floss in a whole new light.

DISCLAIMER: THIS CONTENT IS NOT MEDICAL ADVICE

The information, including but not limited to, text, graphics, images and other material contained on this website are for informational purposes only. The purpose of this website is to promote broad understanding and knowledge of various dental and health topics. It is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Always seek the advice from a qualified medical professional.

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How to Fight Sensitive Teeth

Sensitive teeth can make eating and drinking a highly unpleasant experience. Most people deal with dental sensitivity at some point in their lives, especially as they get older. If you are currently struggling with this problem, there are a few things you can do to make your situation better. Here is a basic guide showing how to fight sensitive teeth.

Use Sensitive Toothpaste

There are a number of ADA approved toothpastes that are specifically designed for sensitive teeth. These products still clean well, but they do not include the same harsh chemicals that are found in a lot of other toothpaste products. Using sensitive toothpaste will ensure that you don’t feel pain when brushing your teeth, which will therefore encourage you to keep up with your oral hygiene.

Bonus Tip:Use your finger to put a little bit of your toothpaste on the sensitive parts of your teeth before you go to bed at night. Spit out any excess that gets in your mouth, but don’t rinse. Try this over the course of a couple weeks, and you might be surprised by how much better your teeth feel.

Use Mouthwash with Fluoride in It

Fluoride works to rebuild your enamel, which will help our teeth stand up against temperature changes and crunchy foods that may hurt you right now. Fluoride also fights tooth decay, which can make your teeth even more sensitive than they already are. Most toothpastes will come with fluoride in them, but you could supplement that by using ACT mouthwash, or a similar product containing fluoride. You won’t cause your mouth any harm along the way.

Use a Soft Bristle Toothbrush

Hard bristle toothbrushes are only going to make your teeth worse. You need to look for a toothbrush that has soft bristles instead. This will also help you if you have problems with brushing your teeth too hard. The added pressure you put on your teeth won’t do nearly as much damage with a soft bristled brush. You can find these in both electric and manual models, and they will usually have an “S” indicator somewhere on the label.

Be Careful with Your Diet

Try not to eat too many hard or sticky candies as those can wear away at your teeth over time. You may also want to avoid almonds, celery sticks, and uncut apples because they are hard to bite into. Stick with foods that won’t hurt when you eat them, and your sensitive teeth will be much better off in the end.

DISCLAIMER: THIS CONTENT IS NOT MEDICAL ADVICE

The information, including but not limited to, text, graphics, images and other material contained on this website are for informational purposes only. The purpose of this website is to promote broad understanding and knowledge of various dental and health topics. It is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Always seek the advice from a qualified medical professional.

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Do I Really Need to Get My Wisdom Teeth Removed?

While most people believe that wisdom teeth removal is a necessity, not every patient has to have his wisdom teeth removed. The reason that most dentists suggest having your wisdom teeth removed at an early age is because they are known for causing serious problems when they are fully formed. By removing them before the issues develop, you have one less problem to worry about. In the article below, we will answer the question, “Do I really need to get my wisdom teeth removed?” so you can be prepared for the future.

Potential Problems with Wisdom Teeth

To understand the purpose of wisdom teeth removal, you need to understand the problems that come with wisdom teeth. In many cases, these teeth will not come in properly. They could come in horizontally, or they could cause your mouth to be overcrowded. Some wisdom teeth only come out partially, which creates a pathway between your teeth and your gums. This area is usually hard to brush, so it is the perfect area for bad bacteria to grow in the mouth.

Signs That You Need Your Wisdom Teeth Removed

If you don’t want to go through wisdom teeth removal until it is in fact necessary, watch out for the following signs:

  • Damage to surrounding teeth
  • Tooth decay
  • Gum disease
  • Pain
  • Repeated infections in the back of the mouth
  • Cysts
  • Tumors

If you are experiencing any of those as a result of your wisdom teeth, it may be best to have them removed.

Signs That You Can Keep Your Wisdom Teeth

There are occasions where wisdom teeth don’t cause any problems at all. In those situations, you can consider keeping your wisdom teeth for the rest of your life. Here are some signs of unnecessary wisdom teeth removal:

  • Your teeth have grown in completely and line up well with other teeth
  • You have no issues biting or chewing with your wisdom teeth
  • You are able to thoroughly clean your wisdom teeth like you do your other teeth
  • Your wisdom teeth and the teeth around them are healthy

We still recommend wisdom teeth removal for most of our patients simply because of how common problems are with them. However, you can assess your personal situation and figure out what will be necessary for you.

DISCLAIMER: THIS CONTENT IS NOT MEDICAL ADVICE

The information, including but not limited to, text, graphics, images and other material contained on this website are for informational purposes only. The purpose of this website is to promote broad understanding and knowledge of various dental and health topics. It is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Always seek the advice from a qualified medical professional.

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Be Prepared for Oral Health Emergencies

Chances are you have a first aid kit in your home, but do you have an emergency dental kit? Dental emergencies can happen just as often as skin scrapes and broken bones. It is better to be prepared for oral health emergencies than suffer in severe pain when an accident comes up. The guide below will show you how to make a dental emergency kit so you can be ready when disaster strikes.

The Contents

What you choose to keep in your dental emergency kit will depend on what you want to be prepared for. Some common components include:

  • Gauze
  • A bottle of water
  • Toothache medicine (drops, gel, or shots)
  • Temporary dental cement
  • Hand sanitizer (or ethyl alcohol)
  • Pain medication
  • Dental wax (especially if you have braces)
  • Floss and mild mouthwash
  • Travel toothpaste
  • Gloves

You can add other elements, like temporary toothbrushes or denture repair material, if you need to. The key here is to put enough supplies in your dental emergency kit to be ready for any situation that may come your way.

The Container

You can put your dental emergency supplies in any container you like. You could even put them all in a bag that you store inside your existing first aid kit. If you are going to put your kit in a separate container, try to get something made of hard plastic with at least one brightly colored site. Clearly label the front so that you or anyone else that comes into your home will know what this kit is when you/they see it.

The Storage

Store your emergency dental kit in the same place you keep your first aid kit. This will most likely be in a centrally located bathroom that is easy to access from any point in your home. If you have more than one floor in your house, you might want to think about making one kit for each floor. This will come in handy when an emergency strikes upstairs.

The Execution

Make sure that everyone in your home knows what the contents of the dental emergency kit are supposed to be used for. Show each family member where the kit is, and go over the components of it piece by piece. Train your babysitters to use the kit as well if you ever leave your children at home. The more prepared you are for oral health emergencies, the better off you will be in the end.

DISCLAIMER: THIS CONTENT IS NOT MEDICAL ADVICE

The information, including but not limited to, text, graphics, images and other material contained on this website are for informational purposes only. The purpose of this website is to promote broad understanding and knowledge of various dental and health topics. It is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Always seek the advice from a qualified medical professional.

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Signs You May Have a Cavity

How do I know if I have a cavity? What are the signs of cavities? What should I watch out for with cavities? We hear questions like these every single day. Your dentist will be able to see if you have a cavity when you come in for your semi-annual cleaning, but that may be months away from you. If you are concerned that you may have a cavity right now, the indicators below will give you a good idea about the current state of your oral health.

Visible Holes

Of course, if you can blatantly see a hole in one of your teeth, you have a cavity. You will most likely encounter some of the other signs below long before you have a noticeable hole, but that does not always happen. Try to keep an eye on your smile as often as possible, especially in the case of your back teeth. Those are the ones that are most likely to have a cavity in them.

Pain

Pain in the mouth is never a good sign. You should not be having pain of any kind on your teeth unless you have a cavity, worn enamel, tooth decay, etc. If your dental pain does not go away after a day or two, you need to schedule a time to see your dentist. You could have a cavity or other issue on your hand that you need to get treatment for.

Sensitivity

Sensitive teeth aren’t always associated with cavities, but they can. If your teeth are sensitive to changes in temperatures or pressure levels, you may have a cavity to deal with. There are other factors to keep in mind though. For instance, if you have recently whitened your teeth, they are going to be more sensitive than usual. Treat your teeth with care during this sensitive time, and schedule a time to see your dentist right away.

Bad Breath

Bad breath can come from the bacteria that live in tooth infections. A cavity is really nothing more than the visible result of a tooth infection. While there are other potential causes of bad breath, this is one of the most common ones. It’s not always about what you eat or how often you brush your teeth. Your teeth themselves could be creating that foul odor in your mouth.

If you think that you have a cavity, contact your dentist to schedule an appointment and get definitive answers you can trust.

DISCLAIMER: THIS CONTENT IS NOT MEDICAL ADVICE

The information, including but not limited to, text, graphics, images and other material contained on this website are for informational purposes only. The purpose of this website is to promote broad understanding and knowledge of various dental and health topics. It is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Always seek the advice from a qualified medical professional.

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Avoid Dental Staining by Staying away from These 5 Drinks

Want to keep your smile as white as possible? The drinks you consume will have a major impact on that. Over time, certain drinks that you love can cause your teeth to turn yellow, or even brown, much like traditional stain does for wood. To avoid dental staining and preserve your white smile, you need to know what drinks to stay away from. We’re here to point you in the right direction.

Common Culprits for Dental Staining

Here are some of the most common drinks that stain teeth:

  • Wine
  • Coffee
  • Tea
  • Soda
  • Sports Drinks

Most of the drinks on this list are dark in nature, with the exception of sports drinks. Highly acidic sports drinks can wear away at your tooth enamel and make your teeth more susceptible to staining. They may not be the direct causes of the problem, but they make it easier for other drinks to soak into your pearly whites. Avoid all of the drinks above when possible to keep your smile bright and white.

Good Drinks for Teeth

We can’t show you the bad drinks for teeth without showing you the good ones too. This list is short and sweet:

  • Water
  • Milk
  • Fruit Juice (no added sweeteners)

Water is your mouth and body’s best friend. It naturally clears out bad bacteria and keeps your mouth healthy and refreshed. Milk contains and assortment of vitamins that your body can use to stay healthy, and fruit juices are packed full of nutrients too. You just have to be careful about drinking acidic fruit juices that can wear away your teeth over time. Citric juices, like lemon juice and grapefruit, can harm your smile even if they help your body.

Take care of your smile and your body at the same time, and you will feel much better about yourself in the end.

DISCLAIMER: THIS CONTENT IS NOT MEDICAL ADVICE

The information, including but not limited to, text, graphics, images and other material contained on this website are for informational purposes only. The purpose of this website is to promote broad understanding and knowledge of various dental and health topics. It is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Always seek the advice from a qualified medical professional.

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How to Clean Your Teeth without a Toothbrush

Brushing your teeth is the best way to get rid of plaque and bad bacteria, but you may not always have a toothbrush handy to help you do that. If you are camping, traveling, or simply too far from your toothbrush to properly care for your teeth, there are a few things you can do to clean off some of the grime. Here is a guide explaining how to clean your teeth without a toothbrush so you can be prepared at all times.

Small Cloth

If you have a small washcloth or some other course material, you might wrap it around your finger and rub it over the surface of your teeth. You don’t want a fabric that’s so abrasive that it ends up damaging your enamel. You just need something that will mimic the bristles of a toothbrush. If you happen to have toothpaste on hand, that would make this process even better.

Mouthwash

Some mouthwashes can damage your teeth over time because the chemicals in them are just too powerful. Your mouth needs some form of bacteria to function properly, so those that get rid of most of the bacteria in your mouth are actually causing harm to your smile. Nevertheless, mouthwash can be a good fallback for times when you may not have a toothbrush on hand. Just make sure you only swig it for the recommended timeframe to avoid overexposure to the chemicals.

Sugarless Chewing Gum

Sugarless chewing gum can actually be a benefit to your oral health because it causes you to naturally produce extra saliva. That saliva will help wash away the bad bacteria in your mouth and flush it out of your system. Chewing gum may also loosen some food particles that are stuck between your teeth. It’s a win-win solution!

Water

As simple as it sounds, water can do wonders for your overall oral hygiene. There is a reason why most dental hygienists use high pressure water picks to remove plaque from your teeth. This is a safe, powerful liquid that can remove a ton of bad bacteria without damaging your smile. If you have no other option for brushing your teeth, rinse your mouth out well with water. You will still need to brush your teeth as soon as you get home, but at least this will keep your mouth as clean as currently possible.

DISCLAIMER: THIS CONTENT IS NOT MEDICAL ADVICE

The information, including but not limited to, text, graphics, images and other material contained on this website are for informational purposes only. The purpose of this website is to promote broad understanding and knowledge of various dental and health topics. It is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Always seek the advice from a qualified medical professional.

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5 Ways to Get Your Kids Excited about Brushing Their Teeth

Do you struggle to get your kids to brush their teeth on their own? Are you concerned about your children’s oral health in the future? Most kids don’t actively want to brush their teeth, much like they don’t want to take a bath or clean their rooms. Nevertheless, these are necessary skills they have to learn if they are going to have a good life in the future.

Here are five ways to get your kids excited about brushing their teeth so you can get rid of the struggle for good.

Get a Fun Toothbrush

Get your child a cool toothbrush that he or she is excited to try. You may be able to do the same with toothpaste too, depending on what your child likes. There are plenty of children’s toothbrushes out there made to look like Disney characters, race cars, dinosaurs, and more. Let your kid come with you to the store to pick out his or her toothbrush, and you could be off the hook for good.

Make a Game out of Brushing Teeth

Remember that little line from Mary Poppins? “In every job that must be done there is an element of fun. Find the fun and *snap*, the job’s a game!” All you need is a little fun to make oral health seem exciting for your child. A simple “I bet I can brush my teeth better than you” might get your kid amped to brush his teeth.

Set up a Rewards System

We’re not suggesting that you pay your child to brush his teeth. That would go a little far. However, you might set up some sort of rewards system that directly connects to dental care. Maybe your child will get to stay up an extra 30 minutes if he brushes his teeth and takes a bath before bed. Maybe 30 days of constant brushing will lead to some sort of big prize. The reward itself is entirely up to you, but try to come up with an incentive for your child to strive for.

Turn Tooth Brushing into an Epic Story

Have you heard? The evil plaque monsters are invading Smile Kingdom, and the only way to get rid of them is to use the powerful Brushomatic 9000. Sounds like fun, right? All it takes is a little story line like that to get your kids to see dental care in a new light. It’s not just about good oral hygiene anymore. It’s an action adventure film brought to life.

Brush Your Teeth at the Same Time

When all else fails, make an effort to lead by example. Show your children that brushing their teeth is a key component to a healthy life. Your kids naturally want to be like you, so you might as well take advantage of that. Spend some quality time with your children and show them the benefits of a bright, healthy smile. Your children will develop great oral care habits all on their own.

DISCLAIMER: THIS CONTENT IS NOT MEDICAL ADVICE

The information, including but not limited to, text, graphics, images and other material contained on this website are for informational purposes only. The purpose of this website is to promote broad understanding and knowledge of various dental and health topics. It is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Always seek the advice from a qualified medical professional.

 

 

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